Sunday, July 19, 2009

Stain Removal - the basics

I know how you feel when you see stains on clothes , bedsheets, walls, or even toys. Even if you dont have kids at home, everything is just prone to stain primarily because of spills. But there's a higher risk when you have kids because they just love to doodle anywhere. They eat foods anywhere. So here, let me share with you this very useful information from the website of Martha Stewart .

Hope it will all help us on one way or another.


Stain First Aid Chart

Combination Solvents
(Shout, Spray 'n Wash)
All-purpose stain removers, particularly good on greasy stains.

Oil Solvents
(K2r, Afta)
Also called dry-cleaning fluid, these remove oily, greasy stains. Safe on nonwashables. Use only on dry fabric in a well-ventilated area. Air clothes after using.

Digestants
(Biz, Era Plus, Wisk)
Also called enzyme cleaners, these detergents contain enzymes that "eat" protein stains, like grass, blood, and egg yolk. Apply directly to damp fabric, or dilute in water, and then soak clothes. Use cold water when treating blood stains. Wool and silk are proteins, so digestants should never be used on these fibers.

Absorbants
(cornstarch, talcum powder)
Sprinkle on fresh grease stains, wait 10 to 15 minutes, then scrape off. Then you can treat the stain.

Detergents
A mild, clear-liquid dishwashing detergent is an effective all-purpose cleaner. Apply it straight, wait five minutes, then flush or dab with water.

Bleaches
Remove the color left behind by stains with mild bleaches, such as lemon juice, white vinegar (mixed 1:1 with water), 2 percent or 3 percent hydrogen peroxide, or ammonia (2 parts water to 1 part ammonia; do not use on wool or silk). Use a cotton swab to dab the bleach, or place paper towels under the fabric, and use an eyedropper to flush the area with the proper bleach. Chlorine bleach, diluted with water, is a last resort.

Denatured Alcohol
Effective at breaking down some stains and evaporates without leaving a residue.

Mineral Spirits
For greasy stains, like tar. Air clothes after using.

Glycerin
Available at drugstores, it is particularly good for ballpoint ink.


No comments:

Post a Comment